Pen

I hate that feeling when you reach into your pocket to grab a pen, but one isn’t there. Panic sets in while you try to play it cool. Acting casual, you ask the couple if they have a pen to sign their marriage license, because you forgot yours. Then when they don’t have one you walk to your car hoping that one is there, all the while scanning random people at the Griffith Observatory trying to figure out who is most likely to have a pen on them.

Do you know what feeling I love?

Finding a pen in the crack of my car seat.

🚘💺🖋️📃🤵👰

Forgetful? Not me!

Today was the elopement of forgetfulness. 

The bride and groom flew all the way from Kentucky to elope at #griffithobservatory but when he went to put on his suit this morning, he realized that he forgot his pants!

The wedding photographer forgot her purse at her house and panicked a little when she saw the signs about paying for parking. I guess you can say she forgot to read the entire sign, for you don’t have to pay before 11am on weekdays. 

After we greeted her in front of the observatory, she placed her bag down, took a photo, and then we all proceeded to the back of the building. We didn’t realize that she left her bag until we were about to start the ceremony, so I ran to grab it. Thankfully it was there. I was more concerned about finding the bomb squad circling the bag than a thief!

I know what you’re thinking. You’re thinking I forgot their names, right? No, I did not! I don’t know why so many people like to ask me that question!

However, as I was walking away, the bride held up a phone and asked, “did you forget your phone?

Remember my Value

“You helped me remember my value.” For some reason those words that she spoke to her groom hung in the air a little longer for me.

As much as we want to think we’re strong and secure individuals, the people around us influence how we view ourselves. How we’re treated in our most intimate relationships (parental and romantic) have a profound power to affirm or warp the perception of our inherit value.

I remember sitting with a counselor talking about my crumbling world. I can’t remember what I was talking about, but my framework must have been so depleted and incredibly skewed that he had to stop me to ask, “what makes you valuable?” 

I couldn’t answer. 

I didn’t have an answer.

So we went on for 30 mins with him asking me questions, trying to draw out of me a new perspective. In that time he slowly gave me a new framework to view myself, as he had me list out things, one after another, about why I have value.

As I think back to that moment, my eyes begin to swell. I was was at a place where I was more broken than I’d ever been, but I was fortunate enough to have someone who spoke something powerful into me. That hour session was a turning point, it began a process of putting together and build back up. It was place where healing found its roots and dug in. It was place where I could look past my immediate wounds and see family and friends who saw value in me.

So there I was at this elopement in Pasadena, listening to her speak that one phrase in her vows. 

She said so much in such few words.

Impromptu Elopement

Last Thursday I received a call from a guy who wanted to get married that weekend. They were planning on getting married in 2020, but earlier in the day she received news from the doctor that shook their world. She had cancer!

He apologized for this appearing so unromantic, but they needed to get her on his insurance. And they needed the marriage certificate ASAP!!!

It is always a little painful to tell someone that there are others who can provide better services that fit their needs, but that’s what I did. They needed a certified copy as proof of their marriage, but Los Angeles County takes 6-8 weeks to process a license and mail the certificate. I told them that going to another county or hiring an officiant who can issue licenses from Orange County would expedite the process by weeks. I could only provide them with a notarized copy on that day, which I wasn’t sure would be sufficient. After talking to his HR department, he realized that it was, so he called me back on Friday and we set a time to meet on Saturday. 

Last Saturday we met at Griffith Park Observatory at Sunset. They ubered, but I didn’t, so I had to park at the bottom of the hill and hike 1 mile up (because there’s never any available parking up there). I had to keep a fast pace to get there on time and I kept on repeating their names saying, “‘Bride’ and ‘Groom’ need you, Jacob. You can’t stop! Keep going!”

They were the best motivation ever to climb up that hill!

We tried to get away from the crowd, so we created a little spot amongst some shrubs below the Observatory, where they committed themselves to each other in marriage.

It was a really beautiful moment. Words carry a different weight when cancer is involved, right? When you say, “in sickness and in health” or “Until death do us part”, at the forefront of your mind is the reality of that possibility.

There is something beautiful in seeing two people come together in crises. When life gets hard, he doesn’t run, but, in fact, he does the opposite. He grips harder. He knows that the next few months to years, he will have to be the one who supports her, who takes her to the hospital, who is with her when she’s nauseous, who listens to her struggle with mortality.

What a beautiful moment! 

What an inspiring moment!

Yes, you’re getting married for a very practical reason, health insurance, but I can’t name anything more romantic!

Lime Officiant

If you were driving around last week in Palos Verdes and thought you saw me riding 15mph down the road in a lime scooter with my suit on and briefcase over my shoulder, know that your eyes were not deceiving you.

Abalone Cove’s parking lot was closed and the nearest parking was a mile away at Terrenea Resorts.

What else was I to do?

I downloaded the app, put some money in the account, and unlocked the scooter.

Unfortunately the battery ran out with .2 miles left, so I did have to walk a little there, and then also trek down the dirt path to the ocean.

After the elopement, I walked the mile back to my car, but it was a beautiful day, so I can’t complain 

Extra Mile

I’ll let you in on a little inside joke…

This is a thank you note from a couple that I married this morning. Originally, we were supposed to meet up yesterday morning at the Observatory, but the park has been working on the roads and the building so everything was closed off these last three days

They asked to push their elopement back a day, which worked for me. I mean, what else am I going to be doing at 5:30 in the morning???

The Park opened the sidewalk for pedestrian this morning, so we had to park at the bottom of the hill and hike up to the Observatory.

There was literally (and I’m using that word in a literal sense) nobody else up there, so we had the whole place to ourselves.

So when they write “Thank you for (literally) going the extra mile for us”….

Well, you get that joke now 

🙂

Sunrise at the Pier

Manhattan Beach Pier

I was just remembering an elopement from a few weeks back when I took this photo.

Confession: I often don’t use last names in my ceremonies, just because a few of them can be very difficult to pronounce. I think I came across my hardest one for this elopement.

What I enjoyed about my memory of that morning (besides the great view), were two people so much in the moment and just so happy to be marring each other that any trouble I had with her last name was so insignificant to the magnitude of their love and commitment.

Not every couple really enjoys the moment. Some get nervous, which is totally understandable. But some are totally present, laughing and crying. They aren’t in their mind…. but just present.

I don’t think this is indication of anything or that it’s a red flag if you do get nervous. I just think that it makes the day more enjoyable for the couple.

So I’ll remember this morning for presence of the couple, their beautiful vows, and the wonderful sunrise.